Brian Lehrer WNYC

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Brian Lehrer leads the conversation about what matters most now in local and national politics, our own communities and our lives.
Updated: 8 hours 28 min ago

Trump Insults TPS Recipients and ICE Targets 7-Eleven Stores Across the Country

Fri, 2018-01-12 11:20

Elise Damas, lawyer and director of the Pathway to Citizenship Long Island at Central American Refugee Center (CARECEN), discusses the legal implications of the dozens of 7-Eleven convenience stores across the country in a push a to punish employers and how it's affecting immigrants on Long Island.

Then, Garry Pierre-Pierre, founder, editor and publisher of The Haitian Times, reacts to the president calling places like Haiti "shithole countries" during a negotiation with lawmakers on immigration.

#AskTheMayor: Columbus Statue Remains, ICE Raids, Divesting from Fossil Fuels

Fri, 2018-01-12 10:34

Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC including the monument commission's decision to keep the Columbus statue at Columbus circle with additional markers honoring indigenous people, commenting on the Trump administration's recent ICE raids and the city's plan to fully divest from companies with fossil fuel reserves.

Ask the Mayor; ICE Raids 7-11s; Recapping Gov. Christie's Tenure; and the Met Museum President Responds

Fri, 2018-01-12 00:00

Coming up on today's show: 

    Bill de Blasio, mayor of New York City, takes calls from listeners and discusses this week in NYC. Elise Damas, lawyer and director of the Pathway to Citizenship Long Island  at Central American Refugee Center (CARECEN), discusses the legal implications of the dozens of 7-Eleven convenience stores across the country in a push a to punish employers  and how it's affecting immigrants in Long Island. Nancy Solomon, managing editor for New Jersey Public Radio, discusses Chris Christie's final moments as governor of New Jersey and recaps his tenure. Dan Weiss, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, talks about the museum's decision to charge out of state visitors  a mandatory admissions fee.

Suing For Climate Change and the City's Plan to Divest From Fossil Fuels

Thu, 2018-01-11 11:59

Zachary Carter, corporation counsel of the City of New York, talks about the city's climate lawsuit against the five biggest oil companies. Then, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer talks about the city's plan to divest its pension funds from fossil fuels.

On the city's plan to divest city pension fund investments from fossil fuel producers, @NYCComptroller says fossil fuel companies "are the past; we want to look at renewables...that's the future."

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

The city's plan for pension fund fossil fuel divestment is not immediately a done deal -- @NYCComptroller says they don't envision this as a hit to the pension funds...but they're still examining.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

NYC's Deadly Private Trash Collection Industry

Thu, 2018-01-11 11:32

Kiera Feldman, reporter for The Investigative Fund and ProPublica, reports on the dangerous and exploitative industry of private trash collection in New York City -- which handles the trash for all businesses in the city.

@kierafeldman says the on a single block, you might have a dozen different garbage companies coming to pick up the trash. One truck might cover 85 miles in a night. It's A LOT of overnight truck traffic.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

Caller Carl worked in private carting, says they were encouraged to run red lights, drive down a one way going the wrong way -- anything to be done before the morning rush starts. "It's a fast-paced free-for-all until someone gets hurt."

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

No @NYCSanitation truck has killed someone since 2014. Private carting companies killed 7 in the last year, via @BrianLehrer

— Don't Trash NYC (@donttrashnyc) January 11, 2018

Sexual Abuse in Elite-Level Sports

Thu, 2018-01-11 11:08

WNYC reporter Alexandra Starr and Bridie Farrell, a former nationally-ranked speed skater, discuss sexual abuse in elite-level Olympic sports, and what parents, athletes and the leaders of the sports can do to stop athletes from being sexually abused by their coaches and doctors.

@BridieUSA says her story of abuse is the same as so many others...her abuser was really helpful, made her feel like she had a chance...then he molested her multiple times a day for months -- he went on to become president of USA speed skating.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

It's often not until they become adults that victims of child sex abuse come forward to tell their story. In many cases, there is no legal recourse at that point. In NY, for example, you have to be 23 and under. --@AlexandraStarr

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

@BridieUSA says she feels like it's even harder for athletes at the lower ranks to come forward. And she is advocating for a change to the statute of limitations for child sexual abuse in NYS.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

@AlexandraStarr says these elite sports "inculcate a mindset that this is all about sacrifice." Here she is (l) with Brian and @BridieUSA (r). pic.twitter.com/SJ2skztBPA

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

@BridieUSA says 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys suffer sexual abuse before they turn 18. Let that sink in.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

Inside The Transcript of the Trump Dossier Firm's Interview

Thu, 2018-01-11 10:38

Devlin Barrett, who covers national security and law enforcement for The Washington Post, and Andrea Bernstein, WNYC's senior editor for politics and policy, talk about the much-discussed transcript of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s interview with the head of Fusion GPS.

@AndreaWNYC on the Deutsche Bank line of investigating: Many banks wouldn't loan to Trump bc of his history of bankruptcies. Deutsche Bank was one of the few who'd lend to him -- so the question is, who backed those loans? (Maybe someone with ties to Russia...?)

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

@DevlinBarrett says what leaps out to him about this transcript is he doesn't know why anyone would expect Congress to solve these riddles -- as Congress is "locked in a...partisan, bitter tug-of-war of which direction this all should go in."

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 11, 2018

Latest on Russia Investigation; Olympics Abuse; NYC's Deadly Private Garbage Industry

Thu, 2018-01-11 00:00

Coming up on today's show: 

    Devlin Barrett, who covers national security and law enforcement for The Washington Post, talks about the much-discussed transcript of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s interview with the head of Fusion GPS. WNYC reporter Alexandra Starr discusses what the U.S. Olympic Committee is doing to stop athletes from being sexually abused by their coaches and doctors. Kiera Feldman, reporter for The Investigative Fund and ProPublica, reports on the dangerous and exploitative industry of private trash collection in New York City -- which handles the trash for all businesses in the city.

 

What’s Your ‘Thing’?

Wed, 2018-01-10 12:14

Tim Herrera, the Smarter Living Editor at The New York Times, discusses the benefits of looking inward to find that one trait or mindset that is holding you back from reaching your full potential – plus listeners call in to share theirs.

Trump's EPA

Wed, 2018-01-10 11:33

Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post senior national affairs correspondent, who is covering changes to the government in the Trump administration, talks about the policy changes at the Environmental Protection Agency in the last year.

Banning Books Behind Bars

Wed, 2018-01-10 11:30

Harvey Murphy Community Organizer on the #CLOSErikers Campaign and Seth Pollack, and organizer at Books Through Bars, talk about a new pilot program in certain New York State prisons which is severely restricting the books available to inmates.

Sexual Assault in the Restaurant Industry

Wed, 2018-01-10 10:36

Sierra Tishgart, senior editor for New York Magazine's food site Grub Street, talks about how some prominent men in the restaurant industry are not speaking publicly about sexual misconduct in their own restaurants, and what they should be doing to help #MeToo move forward.

#MeToo in Restaurants; Banning Books in Prisons; Trump's EPA; What's Your 'Thing?'

Wed, 2018-01-10 00:00

Coming up on today's show: 

    Sierra Tishgart, senior editor for New York Magazine's food site Grub Street, talks about how some prominent men in the restaurant industry are not speaking publicly about sexual misconduct in their own restaurants and what they should be doing to help #MeToo move forward. Taylor Eldridge, investigative fellow at The Marshall Project and Seth Pollack, and organizer at Books through Bars, talk about the new program in New York which is severely restricting the books available to people in certain prisons. Juliet Eilperin, Washington Post senior national affairs correspondent, covering changes to the government in the Trump administration, talks about the policy changes at the EPA in the last year. Tim Herrera, the Smarter Living Editor at The New York Times, discusses the benefits of looking inward to find that one trait or mindset that is holding you back from reaching your  full potential – plus listeners call in to share theirs.

Another View of the Vietnam War

Tue, 2018-01-09 12:01

Max Boot, military scholar and senior fellow at The Council on Foreign Relations and the author of The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam (Liveright, 2018), re-examines the life of the man who served as the model for "The Quiet American" and the U.S. defeat in Vietnam. Plus: he reflects on this essay he wrote late last year, called "2017 Was the Year I Learned About My White Privilege." 

If you have any questions for @MaxBoot on Edward Lansdale, Vietnam (or other relevant foreign policy questions), give us a call now: 212-433-9692. pic.twitter.com/0XILMjCDpI

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

After a listener asks about similarities between communism + Islamist extremism, @MaxBoot says both movements have an underlying commonality -- they feed off state failure.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

A Shift in the Met's Admissions Policy

Tue, 2018-01-09 11:34

For the first time in 50 years, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be charging out-of-state visitors a mandatory admissions fee of $25. Jerry Saltz, senior art critic at New York Magazine, explains why he thinks this change points to a bigger problem for the Museum and the art world.

Now: @NYMag art critic @jerrysaltz is here to talk about the @metmuseum’s new admissions policy. pic.twitter.com/6sP4Ou2DL3

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

The Big Local Stories You May Have Missed in 2017

Tue, 2018-01-09 11:26

Ginia Bellafante, Big City columnist for The New York Times, talks about the big local stories people may have missed in 2017 while they were busy keeping up with the relentless national news cycle, including how the opioid crisis is devastating the Bronx and the lack of police accountability in New York City.

The next example by @GiniaNYT is the lack of police accountability in the NYPD -- she talks about how records of individual cops are kept secret.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

Negotiations Continue on Big-Ticket Policy Items Rolled Into the Government Funding Bill

Tue, 2018-01-09 10:46

Congress is attempting to craft a funding bill that has lots of big issues tied up in it -- including immigration, children's health insurance and more. Lawmakers need to get this done soon -- the current (temporary) bill only funds the government until January 19. NPR congressional reporter Kelsey Snell reports whether a shutdown could happen over this and other news from the Hill.

@kelsey_snell says people are telling her lawmakers are hoping to have a breakthrough today on these budget talks, but it's possible they'll stretch into next week.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

Brian asks if people are seeing the potential for a DACA deal by next Friday -- @NPR's @kelsey_snell says "it would be difficult," and they may go for another short-term deal to buy some more time to work on DACA.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

There are people who raise the specter of a gov't shutdown, but @kelsey_snell says it's not really the type of conversation that people on the Hill are having. Dems want to be able to say 'we ran the gov't, even in difficult times.'

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

Not all Republicans in Congress support building a border wall -- in fact, @kelsey_snell says it doesn't even have particularly wide support on the Hill.

— Brian Lehrer Show (@BrianLehrer) January 9, 2018

Immigration and a Budget Deal in DC; Local Stories You May Have Missed; The Met's Plan to Charge Out-of-Towners; Another View of Vietnam

Tue, 2018-01-09 00:00

Coming up on today's show: 

    New York Times Big City columnist Ginia Bellafante rounds up some big local stories you may have missed. New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz looks at the Met Museum's new plan to charge admission for out-of-towners.  Max Boot, military scholar, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and the author of the new book The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam (Liveright, 2018), re-examines the life of the man who served as the model for "The Quiet American" and the U.S. defeat in Vietnam.